Cold Weather Construction

Across North America, cargo shorts, Capri pants and flip-flops are relegated to the back of the closet, with parkas, sweaters and boots taking their place. And just as we winterize our bodies and our cars with warm clothes and snow tires, we do much the same to our houses in preparation for the cold months ahead, from cleaning out gutters to sealing cracks around windows and doors, wrapping pipes with insulation, replacing the furnace filter, draining water from the outside faucet and – if there is a fireplace or woodstove – stocking up on firewood. And those who fail to prepare often pay the price with drafts and high heating costs or, even worse, mould, moisture damage or frozen pipes.

Building for the Winter Ahead

A Proactive Approach to Resolving a Longstanding Debate

About forty skilled Central and South American workers from Ecuador, Peru, Columbia and Costa Rica came to British Columbia, Canada as temporary foreign workers (TFWs) in 2006. This story incited Labourers’ International Union of North America (LiUNA) call for reforms to Canada’s TFW program (TFWP) and the International Mobility Program (IMP). LiUNA, a powerful voice within the construction industry with over half a million members – 110,000 of whom are in Canada – has been the only Canadian union to address the issue.

June 24, 2018, 10:26 AM EDT